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The Cataclysm's of The Earth Glossary
200 or so words, unknown to a crude spell checker, that were found in "Cataclysm's of The Earth"
amphibolite A metamorphic rock composed chiefly of amphibole with minor plagioclase and little quartz.
animalculae
/ an·i·mal·cule
A microscopic or minute organism, such as an amoeba or paramecium, usually considered to be an animal. Archaic. A tiny animal, such as a mosquito.
antev Unknown Word
arcturus The fourth brightest star in the sky and the brightest star in the constellation Bootes, approximately 36 light-years from Earth. [Middle English, from Latin Arcturus, from Greek Arktouros : arktos, bear + ouros, guard (from its position behind Ursa Major).]
arrhenius Scientist, born near Uppsala, Sweden. He became professor of physics at Stockholm in 1895, a director of the Nobel Institute in 1905, and was awarded the 1903 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. He did valuable work in connection with the dissociation theory of electrolysis, and on reaction rates, and he was the first to recognize the 'greenhouse effect' on climate
assam A former kingdom of extreme northeast India, now a state separated from the rest of the country by Bangladesh. The kingdom was founded by invaders from Burma and China in the 13th century.
as·sev·er·ated To declare seriously or positively; affirm.
authogenetic au·to·gen·e·sis / a·bi·o·gen·e·sis (a'bi-o-jen'i-sis) n. The supposed development of living organisms from nonliving matter. Also called autogenesis, spontaneous generation. a'bi·o·ge·net'ic (-j?-net'ik) or a'bi·o·ge·net'i·cal adj.
auxines Unknown Word
baffin A district and administrative region of eastern Nunavut, Canada, including Baffin Island, the Queen Elizabeth and Parry islands, and Melville Peninsula.
baikal Not Defined
bandera Not Defined
bayerBayer AG is a diversified, international chemical and pharmaceutical company. BAYZ offers products and services in areas ranging from health care and agriculture to plastics, specialty chemicals and imaging technologies. For the 3 months ended 3/31/01, revenue rose 10% to EUR7.66B. Net income fell 21% to EUR442M. Results reflect the acquisition of the polyols business of Lyondell Chemical's, offset by the persistently high level of raw material costs.
bellingshausenExplorer, born in Estonia. In 1819-21 he led an expedition around the world which made several discoveries in the Pacific, and sailed to 70'S, probably discovering the Antarctic continent. The Bellingshausen Sea was named after him.
bereskovka Not Defined
bibby Not Defined
bonnevilleSoldier, born in or near Paris, France. He came to the USA in 1803 and graduated from West Point in 1815. His record of his expedition to the Green River in Wyoming (1832-5) was edited by Washington Irving and published as The Adventures of Captain Bonneville, USA, in the Rocky Mountains and the Far West.
borhyrna
borings Drilling (plural)
bouguer Physicist, born in Le Croisie, NW France. In 1735 he was sent with others to Peru to measure a degree of the meridian at the equator. His views on the intensity of light laid the foundation of photometry. In 1748 he invented the heliometer.
brownian Home of Brownian Motion Pictures, providing film production services, with company, service, contact, and other related infoand links.
buddington
burbank
calcaranite
careenings HAB's word for the geological shift of the Earth's Axis of rotaion from one geological point to another and the acompanying movement of what had been the pole to a point far off the Earth's new axis of spin

v., -reened, -reen·ing, -reens.

v.intr. To lurch or swerve while in motion.
To rush headlong or carelessly; career: "He careened through foreign territories on a desperate kind of blitz" (Anne Tyler).

Nautical.

To lean to one side, as a ship sailing in the wind. To turn a ship on its side for cleaning, caulking, or repairing.
v.tr. Nautical.

To cause (a ship) to lean to one side; tilt.

To lean (a ship) on one side for cleaning, caulking, or repairing. To clean, caulk, or repair (a ship in this position).

n. Nautical.

The act or process of careening a ship.
The position of a careened ship.
[From French (en) caréne, (on) the keel, from Old French carene, from Old Italian carena, from Latin carina.]
ca·reen'er n. USAGE NOTE The implication of rapidity that most often accompanies the use of careen as a verb of motion may have arisen naturally through the extension of the nautical sense of the verb to apply to the motion of automobiles, which generally careen, that is, lurch or tip over, only when driven at high speed. There is thus no reason to conclude that this use of the verb is the result of a confusion of careen with career, "to rush." Whatever the origin of this use, however, it is by now so well established that it would be pedantic to object to it.
cataclysmist
/ cataclysmists
/ catastrophism
/ catastrophists
ca·tas·tro·phism (k?-tas'tr?-fiz'?m) n. Geology. The doctrine that major changes in the earth's crust result from catastrophes rather than evolutionary processes. The prediction or expectation of cataclysmic upheaval, as in political or social developments.
chaldean
/ chaldeans
An ancient region of southern Mesopotamia. Settled c. 1000 B.C., it reached the height of its power under Nebuchadnezzar II. The Chaldean empire was destroyed by Persians in 539 B.C.

Of or relating to Chaldea or its people, language, or culture.

n. A member of an ancient Semitic people who ruled in Babylonia. See Aramaic. A person versed in occult learning. Chal·da'ic (-da'ik) adj. & n.
chenA Chinese dynasty that ruled from 557 to 589.
chignecto
chimborazoAn extinct volcano, 6,271.1 m (20,561 ft) high, in central Ecuador. The highest elevation of the Cordillera Real, it was first scaled in 1880.
circumferentialcir·cum·fer·ence (s?r-kum'f?r-?ns)

n. The boundary line of a circle.
The boundary line of a figure, area, or object. (Abbr. c or circ.) The length of such a boundary. [Middle English, from Old French circonference, from Latin circumferentia, from circumferens, circumferent-, present participle of circumferre, to carry around : circum-, circum- + ferre, to carry.]

cir·cum'fer·en'tial (-f?-ren'sh?l) adj.

SYNONYMS circumference, circuit, compass, perimeter, periphery. These nouns refer to a line around a closed figure or area: the circumference of the earth; followed the circuit around the park; stayed within the compass of the schoolyard; the perimeter of a rectangle; a fence around the periphery of the property.
cnossusAn ancient city of northern Crete near present-day Iraklion. The center of a Bronze Age culture that probably flourished from c. 2000 to 1400 B.C., it is the traditional site of the labyrinth of Daedalus and the palace of King Minos.
conglomeraticFrom con·glom·er·ate (k?n-glom'?-rat')

v., -at·ed, -at·ing, -ates.
v.intr.
To form or gather into a mass or whole.
To form into or merge with a corporate conglomerate.
B v.tr.
To cause to form into a mass or whole.
 
A collected heterogeneous mass; a cluster: a city-suburban conglomerate; a conglomerate of color, passion, and artistry.

Geology. A rock consisting of pebbles and gravel embedded in cement.
adj. (-?r-it) Gathered into a mass; clustered.
Geology. Made up of loosely cemented heterogeneous material.
[Latin conglomerare, conglomerat- : com-, com- + glomerare, to wind into a ball (from glomus, glomer-, ball).] con·glom'er·at'ic (-?-rat'ik) or con·glom'er·it'ic (-?-rit'ik) adj. con·glom'er·a'tor n.
creepageThe aftermath of slow movement
critias(c.460-403 BC) Athenian orator and politician, a pupil of Socrates. In 411 BC he took part in the oligarchical revolution that set up the government of Four Hundred. Exiled in 406 BC, he returned two years later, and as a strong supporter of Sparta became one of the Thirty Tyrants set up by the Spartans after their defeat of Athens at the end of the Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC). He had a high reputation as an orator, and wrote poetry and tragedies.
culebra
curvilinearFormed, bounded, or characterized by curved lines.

deucalion
n. Greek Mythology.

A son of Prometheus who with his wife, Pyrrha, built an ark and floated in it to survive the deluge sent by Zeus. The couple became the ancestors of the renewed human race.
diemen
dionysiusTyrant of Syracuse (405-367 BC) and ruler of half of Sicily, whose influence extended over most of S Italy. His reign was dominated by intermittent warfare with the Carthaginians, his chief rivals for power in Sicily. A patron of the arts, he invited Plato to his court, and even won a prize himself for tragedy at one of the great Athenian dramatic festivals.
djoudi
dolni
donnelly
ellipticity el·lip·tic·i·ty (i-lip'tis'i-te) n. Deviation from perfect circular or spherical form toward elliptic or ellipsoidal form. The degree of this deviation.
epiphytesn. A plant, such as a tropical orchid or a staghorn fern, that grows on another plant upon which it depends for mechanical support but not for nutrients. Also called aerophyte, air plant.
erebusn. Greek Mythology. The dark region of the underworld through which the dead must pass before they reach Hades.
eskers n. A long, narrow ridge of coarse gravel deposited by a stream flowing in or under a decaying glacial ice sheet. Also called os. [Irish Gaelic eiscir, from Old Irish escir.]
evectionn. Solar perturbation of the lunar orbit. [Latin evectio, evection-, a going up, from evectus, past participle of evehere, to raise up : e-, ex-, up from; see ex- + vehere, to carry.]
evzen

fizeau
footmarksThe amount of geographic space covered by an object. A computer footprint is the desk or floor surface it occupies. A satellite's footprint is the earth area covered by its downlink.
foraminiferaThe oldest fossil foraminifera, from the Cambrian, are simple agglutinated tubes. Calcareous microgranular and porcellaneous tests evolved in the Carboniferous, and calcareous hyaline tests in the Permian.
foucaultPhysicist, born in Paris, France. He began by studying medicine, but turned to physics. He determined the velocity of light, and showed that light travels more slowly in water than in air (1850). He invented the gyroscope (1852), and improved the mirrors of reflecting telescopes (1858). In 1851 he demonstrated the rotation of the Earth by using a 67`m/220`ft pendulum hung in the dome of the Panthéon, Paris
fucas
fundy
An inlet of the Atlantic Ocean in southeast Canada between New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

glaciated

Covered by Glaciers
globergerina
/ globigerina
/ globogerinaidae
Protoctista ... food vacuoles. elimination by exocytosis; contractile vacuoles; examples: Amoeba proteus, Entamoeba histolytica, Difflugia, Arcella, Actinosphaerium, Globergerina. ...
gneisses A banded or foliated metamorphic rock, usually of the same composition as granite. [German Gneis, probably alteration of Middle High German ganeist, spark (from its appearance), from Old High German gneista.]
granitesis Not Found
guyots A flat-topped submarine mountain. [After Arnold Henri Guyot (1807-1884), Swiss-born American geologist and geographer.]
hatshepsut c.1540-c.1481 BC Queen of Egypt of the XVIIIth dynasty, the daughter of Thutmose I. She was married to Thutmose II, on whose accession (1516 BC) she became the real ruler. On his death (1503 BC) she acted as regent for his son, Thuthmose III, then had herself crowned as Pharaoh. Maintaining the fiction that she was male, she was represented with the regular pharaonic attributes, including a beard. See also: Thutmose III
hellen in Greek mythology, ancestor of the Hellenes, or Greeks; son of Deucalion and Pyrrha. His sons Dorus, Xuthus, and Aeolus were the progenitors of the principal Greek nations-the Dorians, Ionians, Achaeans (see under Achaea), and Aeolians.
helmontHelmont, Jan Baptista van (1579-1644) Chemist, born in Brussels, Belgium. He studied medicine, mysticism, and chemistry under the influence of Paracelsus, devoting much study to gases, and invented the term gas. He was the first to take the melting-point of ice and the boiling-point of water as standards for temperature. Through his experiments he bridged the gap between alchemy and chemistry.
Hennepin
Herodotus (Known as "the Father of History.") Fifth century B.C.. Greek historian whose writings, chiefly concerning the Persian Wars, are the earliest known examples of narrative history.
hertzian The frequency of electrical vibrations (cycles) per second. Abbreviated "Hz," one Hz is equal to one cycle per second. In 1883, Heinrich Hertz detected electromagnetic waves.
hitchins
holdfasts n. Any of various devices used to fasten something securely. Biology. An organ or structure of attachment, especially the basal, rootlike formation by which certain seaweeds or other algae are attached to a substrate.
interpretated
isostacy i·sos·ta·sy (i-sos't?-se) n. Equilibrium in the earth's crust such that the forces tending to elevate landmasses balance the forces tending to depress landmasses.
jhortName of an Explorer
keokuk Ke·o·kuk (ke'?-kuk') , 1790?-1848?. American Sauk leader who aided the United States in the Black Hawk War (1832) and negotiated peace between his people and the Sioux (1837).
kutomanov Geographical variability of mammoths in the ... ... References. Averianov, AO 1994. Kutomanov mammoth. Trudy Zool. Inst. Ross. Akad. Nauk 256: 111-135. (In Russian). Full essay
laminaria n. Any of a genus (Laminaria) of large chiefly perennial kelps of which some have been used to dilate the cervix in performing an abortion
langmannerdorf ... FLaderer, F., 1997, Langmannerdorf. - In: DoPPES, D. & RABEDER, G. (Hrsg.), Pliozane und Pleistozane Faunen osterreichs, Mitt. Komm. Quartarforsch. osterr ... www.univie.ac.at/Palaeontologie/publications_1997.htm
lapina
laplace Laplace, Pierre Simon, Marquis de , also known as Comte de (Count of) Laplace laplas (1749-1827) Mathematician and astronomer, born in Beaumont-en-Auge, NW France. He studied at Caen, and became professor of mathematics at the Ecole Militaire, Paris. He applied his mathematical knowledge to physical astronomy, particularly the stability of orbits in the Solar System. His five-volume Mécanique céleste (1799-1825, Celestial Mechanics) is a landmark in applied mathematics. In his study of the gravitational attraction of spheroids, he formulated the fundamental differential equation in physics which now bears his name. He entered the Senate in 1799, and was made a peer in 1815.
laplace Laplace, Pierre Simon, Marquis de , also known as Comte de (Count of) Laplace laplas (1749-1827) Mathematician and astronomer, born in Beaumont-en-Auge, NW France. He studied at Caen, and became professor of mathematics at the Ecole Militaire, Paris. He applied his mathematical knowledge to physical astronomy, particularly the stability of orbits in the Solar System. His five-volume Mécanique céleste (1799-1825, Celestial Mechanics) is a landmark in applied mathematics. In his study of the gravitational attraction of spheroids, he formulated the fundamental differential equation in physics which now bears his name. He entered the Senate in 1799, and was made a peer in 1815.
laurentianLau·ren·tian (lo-ren'sh?n) adj. Of, relating to, or being in the vicinity of the St. Lawrence River. Geology. Of or relating to the Precambrian gneissic granite of the Lake Superior area. [From Latin Laurentius, Lawrence.]
libbyLibby, Willard (Frank) (1908-80) Chemist, born in Grand Valley, Colorado, USA. He studied and lectured at Berkeley, CA, and was involved in atom bomb research at Columbia (1941-5). He became professor of chemistry at Chicago (1945-54), a member of the US Atomic Energy Commission (1954-9), and professor of chemistry at Los Angeles (1959-76). He received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1960 for his part in the invention of the carbon-14 method of dating
lorentz Lorentz, Hendrik Antoon (1853-1928) Physicist, born in Arnhem, The Netherlands. He studied at Leyden and became professor of mathematical physics there (1878), and from 1923 directed research at the Taylor Institute, Haarlem. He clarified the electromagnetic theory of James Clerk Maxwell, and introduced the concept of local time while working on the Michelson-Morley experiment. In 1902 he was awarded, with Pieter Zeeman, the Nobel Prize for Physics for his theory of electromagnetic radiation. Their work led to Einstein's theory of special relativity.
mamillata
Manitowoc Wisconsin USA
menes Me·nes (me'nez) , fl. 3000 B.C.. King of Egypt who founded the first dynasty uniting Upper and Lower Egypt.
menominee A Native American people formerly inhabiting an area along the Menominee River, with a present-day population in northeast Wisconsin. A member of this people. The Algonquian language of this people.
meristomatic mer·i·stem (mer'i-stem') n. The undifferentiated plant tissue from which new cells are formed, as that at the tip of a stem or root. [Greek meristos, divided (from merizein, to dividefrom meris, division) + -em (as in XYLEMPHLOEM).]
moravia Mo·ra·vi·a (m?-ra've-?, mo-) A region of central and eastern Czech Republic. Settled by a Slavic people at the end of the sixth century A.D., it became an independent kingdom in 870 but fell to the Magyars in 906 and later to the Bohemians. In 1526 Moravia came under the rule of the Austrian Hapsburgs. It was incorporated into Czechoslovakia in 1918.
neustupny
nordenskioldNordenskiold, Nils Otto Gustaf - Biographical entry ... Nordenskiold, Nils Otto Gustaf. Born: Sweden. Antarctic explorer. Nordenskiold commanded the Swedish South Polar Expedition 1901-4.
nunataksAMLAMP: Queen Alexandra Range-Goodwin Nunataks Area ANTARCTIC METEORITE LOCATION AND MAPPING PROJECT (AMLAMP). QUEEN ALEXANDRA RANGE-GOODWIN NUNATAKS AREA EXPLANATORY TEXT AND METEORITE LISTING. ... www.lpi.usra.edu/publications/amlamp/queen.alex.html -
nutations nu·ta·tion (nu-ta'sh?n, nyu-) n. The act or an instance of nodding the head. A wobble in a spinning gyroscope or other rotating body. Astronomy. A small periodic motion of the celestial pole of the earth with respect to the pole of the ecliptic. Botany. A slight curving or circular movement in a stem, as of a twining plant, caused by irregular growth rates of different parts. [Latin nutatio, nutation-, from nutatus, past participle of nutare.]
oceania islands of the southern, western, and central Pacific Ocean, including Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. The term is sometimes extended to encompass Australia, New Zealand, and the Malay Archipelago. O'ce·an'i·an adj. & n.
orgneous
orthoclase or·tho·clase (or'th?-klas', -klaz') n. A variety of feldspar, essentially potassium aluminum silicate, KAlSi3O8, characterized by a monoclinic crystalline structure and found in igneous or granitic rock. Also called potash feldspar. [Greek ortho-, ortho- + Greek klasis, a breaking (from klan, to break).]
osirisor·tho·clase (or'th?-klas', -klaz') n. A variety of feldspar, essentially potassium aluminum silicate, KAlSi3O8, characterized by a monoclinic crystalline structure and found in igneous or granitic rock. Also called potash feldspar. [Greek ortho-, ortho- + Greek klasis, a breaking (from klan, to break).]
outwash out·wash (out'wosh', -wosh') n. Sediment deposited by streams flowing away from a melting glacier.
overthrustMovement of one large geogological feature over another, as with tectonic plates
parnassus Par·nas·sus (par-nas'?s) also Par·nas·sos (-na-sos'). A mountain, about 2,458 m (8,060 ft) high, of central Greece north of the Gulf of Corinth. In ancient times it was sacred to Apollo, Dionysus, and the Muses. Delphi was at the foot of the mountain.
peatspeat (pet) n. Partially carbonized vegetable matter, usually mosses, found in bogs and used as fertilizer and fuel.
pecos Pe·cos (pa'k?s) A river of eastern New Mexico and western Texas flowing about 1,490 km (926 mi) south and southeast to the Rio Grande.
phallusia Phallusia mammillata TUNICATA, SEA SQUIRTS. Phallusia mammillata (Cuvier, 1815). Phallusia mammillata The largest ... www.itsligo.ie/biomar/tunicata/PHAMAM.HTM
phototubeAn electron tube with a photosensitive cathode.
plagioclase pla·gi·o·clase (pla'je-?-klas', -klaz', plaj'e-) n. Any of a common rock-forming series of triclinic feldspars, consisting of mixtures of sodium and calcium aluminum silicates. Also called oligoclase. [Greek plagio-, plagio- + Greek klasis, breaking (from its oblique cleavage) (from klan, to break).]
poughkeepsie A city of southeast New York on the Hudson River north of New York City. Settled by the Dutch in 1687, Poughkeepsie is the seat of Vassar College (chartered 1861). Population: 28,844.
predmosti
principia prin·cip·i·um (prin-sip'e-?m) n., pl. -i·a (-e-?). A principle, especially a basic one.
pulpification
pulsions
pyition
pyroxenepy·rox·ene (pi-rok'sen') n. Any of a group of crystalline silicate minerals common in igneous and metamorphic rocks and containing two metallic oxides, as of magnesium, iron, calcium, sodium, or aluminum. [French pyroxéne : Greek puro-, pyro- + Greek xenos, stranger (originally viewed as a foreign substance when found in igneous rocks).] py'rox·en'ic (pi'rok-se'nik
pyrra / pyrrha
quarternary
radiolarians ra·di·o·lar·i·an (ra'de-o-lar'e-?n) n. Any of various marine protozoans of the order Radiolaria, having rigid siliceous skeletons and spicules. [From New Latin Radiolaria, order name, from Late Latin radiolus, diminutive of Latin radius, ray.]
rastall
resociating made that up, I couldn't find it in the dictionary, but it is pretty obvious. So, processing is basically about resociating stuff so that it is more optimum. ... www.worldtrans.org/TP/TP2/TP2A-97.HTML -
rideout
riksmuseum
risings Ascending, sloping upward, or advancing: a rising tide. Coming to maturity; emerging: the rising generation.
rochefoucauld La Rochefoucauld, Francois, duc de (Duke of) la roshfookoh (1613-80) Classical writer, born in Paris, France. He devoted himself to the cause of the queen, Marie de' Medici, in opposition to Richelieu, and became entangled in a series of love adventures and political intrigues, and was forced to live in exile (1639-42). Involved in the wars of the Frondes, he was wounded at the siege of Paris, and retired to the country after being wounded again in 1652. His Mémoires, written in retirement, was published in 1664, but as it gave wide offence he denied its authorship. He is best known for his Réflexions, ou sentences et maximes morales (first edition, 1665), commonly known as the Maximes, making him the leading exponent of the French literary term maxime ('maxim'). See also:
rotan
rotatel
runcorn Runcorn, (Stanley) Keith (1922-95) Geophysicist, born in Southport, Lancashire, NW England, UK. He studied at Cambridge, worked at the Radar Research Establishment (1943-6), held posts in physics at Manchester (1946-9) and geophysics at Cambridge and Los Angeles (1949-55), and became professor of physics at Newcastle University (1956-88). He is best known for his studies of terrestrial magnetism, by which he helped to confirm the theory of continental drift. See also:
sargasso / sargassum sar·gas·so (sar-gas'o) n., pl. -sos. See gulfweed. [Portuguese sargaco
savaiiSa·vai'i or Sa·vai·i (sa-vi'e) An island of Samoa (formerly Western Samoa) in the southwest Pacific Ocean. It is the largest of the Samoa Islands.
scd abbr. Latin. Scientiae Doctor (Doctor of Science)
schiehallien
sedov
sef
senmut
shaley shale (shal) n. A fissile rock composed of layers of claylike, fine-grained sediments. [Probably from Middle English, shell, from Old English scealu.]
silicification / silicified si·lic·i·fy (si-lis'?-fi') v., -fied, -fy·ing, -fies. v.tr. To convert into or impregnate with silica. v.intr. To become converted into or impregnated with silica.
sillimantic
siriusSir·i·us (sir'e-?s) n. A star in the constellation Canis Major, the brightest star in the sky, approximately 8.6 light-years distant from Earth. Also called Dog Star, Sothis. [Latin Sirius, from Greek Seirios, from seirios, burning.]
slaty slat·y (sla'te) adj., -i·er, -i·est. Composed of or resembling slate. Having the color of slate.
slickened slick·en (slik'?n) tr. & intr.v., -ened, -en·ing, -ens. To make or become slick.
slickensided slick·en·side (slik'?n-sid') n. A polished, striated rock surface caused by one rock mass sliding over another in a fault plane. [Dialectal slicken, glossy (alteration of SLICK) + SIDE.]
slimes slime A dweeb's term for a sales person. See dweeb and suit.
smyth
soundings The act of one that sounds. A probe of the environment for scientific observation. A measured depth of water. Water shallow
spalled spall (spol) n. A chip, fragment, or flake from a piece of stone or ore. v., spalled, spall·ing, spalls. v.tr. To break up into chips or fragments. v.intr. To chip or crumble. [Middle English spalle.]
speratis
stemeck
sterneck
sublette
sverdrupSver·drup (sver'dr?p, sfer'-) , Otto Neumann 1855-1930. Norwegian explorer who led many expeditions to the Arctic and observed a number of previously uncharted islands.
synclines (Click to enlarge) syncline (Precision Graphics) syn·cline (sin'klin') n. Geology. A fold in rocks in which the rock layers dip inward from both sides toward the axis. [Back-formation from SYNCLINAL.]
tanganyika Sorted by : Relevance Title Description Alternatives for your query Tanganyika (former country of east-central Africa) Tanganyika, Lake Tanganyika (former country of east-central Africa) Tanganyika, Lake Tanganyika (former country of east-central Africa) Tanganyika, Lake Tan·gan·yi·ka (tan'g?n-ye'k?, tang'-) A former country of east-central Africa. A British mandate after 1920, it became independent in 1961 and joined with Zanzibar to form Tanzania in 1964. Tan'gan·yi'kan adj. & n.
terriginous ter·rig·e·nous (te-rij'?-n?s) adj. Derived from the land, especially by erosive action. Used primarily of sediments. [From Latin terrigena, earth-born : terra, earth + -GENOUS.] --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
thebes Thebe (satellite of Jupiter) Thebes (city of ancient S Egypt) Thebes (ancient city of Boeotia) Thebes (city, IL) The·be (the'be) n. The satellite of Jupiter that is fourth in distance from the planet. [Latin Thebe, a nymph, daughter of the river god Asopus, from Greek.]
throwoff
tibesti Tibesti Volcanic Region, Chad Tibesti Volcanic Region, Chad. This ancient volcano at Tibesti (19.0N, 19.0E) Chad, Africa has ... volcano.und.nodak.edu/vwdocs/volc_images/img_tibesti.html
tiered tier1 (tir) n. One of a series of rows placed one above another: a stadium with four tiers of seats. A rank or class. tr. & intr.v., tiered, tier·ing, tiers. To arrange (something) into or rise in tiers: tier a wedding cake; balconies that tier upward. [Middle English tire, row, rank, from Old French, from tirer, to draw out. See tirade.] ti·er2 (ti'?r) n. One that ties: a tier of knots.
transversed trans·verse (trans-vûrs', tranz-, trans'vûrs', tranz'-) adj. Situated or lying across; crosswise. n. Something, such as a part or beam, that is transverse. [Latin transversus, from past participle of transvertere, to turn across : trans, trans- + vertere, to turn.] trans·verse'ly adv.
trunnions trans·verse (trans-vûrs', tranz-, trans'vûrs', tranz'-) adj. Situated or lying across; crosswise. n. Something, such as a part or beam, that is transverse. [Latin transversus, from past participle of transvertere, to turn across : trans, trans- + vertere, to turn.] trans·verse'ly adv.
tubingen trans·verse (trans-vûrs', tranz-, trans'vûrs', tranz'-) adj. Situated or lying across; crosswise. n. Something, such as a part or beam, that is transverse. [Latin transversus, from past participle of transvertere, to turn across : trans, trans- + vertere, to turn.] trans·verse'ly adv.
tundras tun·dra (tun'dr?) n. A treeless area between the icecap and the tree line of Arctic regions, having a permanently frozen subsoil and supporting low-growing vegetation such as lichens, mosses, and stunted shrubs. [Russian, from Sami tundar, flat-topped hill.]
uddin
ultramundaneul·tra·mun·dane (ul'tr?-mun'dan', -mun-dan') adj. Extending or being beyond the world or the limits of the universe. [Latin ultramundanus : ultra-, ultra- + mundanus, of the world; see mundane.]
unconformities un·con·for·mi·ty (un'k?n-for'mi-te) n., pl. -ties. Lack of conformity; nonconformity. Geology. A surface between successive strata representing a missing interval in the geologic record of time, and produced either by an interruption in deposition or by the erosion of depositionally continuous strata followed by renewed deposition.
undergrowths
unfossiliferous Without Fossils
uniformitarians u·ni·for·mi·tar·i·an·ism (yu'n?-for'mi-tar'e-?-niz'?m) n. The theory that all geologic phenomena may be explained as the result of existing forces having operated uniformly from the origin of the earth to the present time.
upswellings
upthrusts up·thrust (up'thrust') n. An upward thrust, especially of part of the earth's crust. tr. & intr.v., -thrust·ed, -thrust·ing, -thrusts. To thrust or be thrusted upward. Used especially of the earth's crust.
ur Ur (ûr, ?r) (Known in biblical times as Ur of the Chal·dees (kal'dez', kal-dez')) A city of ancient Sumer in southern Mesopotamia on a site in present-day southeast Iraq. One of the oldest cities in Mesopotamia, it was an important center of Sumerian culture after c. 3000 B.C. and the birthplace of Abraham. The city declined after the sixth century B.C.
varve varve (varv) n. A layer or series of layers of sediment deposited in a body of still water in one year. [Swedish varv, layer, from varva, to bend, from Old Norse hverfa.]
vega Ve·ga (ve'g?, va'-) n. The brightest star in the constellation Lyra. [Medieval Latin, from Arabic (an-nasr) al-waqi', the falling (eagle), Vega : al-, the + waqi', falling, active participle of waqa'a, to fall.]
vernon
vestonice a village called Dolni Vestonice in the Czech province of Moravia,
vilui Vil·yu·i (vil-yu'e) A river of eastern Russia flowing about 2,446 km (1,520 mi) eastward to the Lena River.
wady wa·di also wa·dy (wa'de) . n., pl. -dis also -dies. A valley, gully, or streambed in northern Africa and southwest Asia that remains dry except during the rainy season. A stream that flows through such a channel. An oasis. [Arabic wadi.]
waldemar Wal·de·mar I (wol'd?-mar', val'-) or Val·de·mar I (val'-), (Known as "Waldemar the Great.") 1131-1182. Danish king (1157-1182) who extended his realm and gained recognition for the hereditary rule of his family
warpings warp (worp) v., warped, warp·ing, warps. v.tr. To turn or twist (wood, for example) out of shape. To turn from a correct or proper course; deflect. To affect unfavorably, unfairly, or wrongly; bias. See synonyms at bias. To arrange (strands of yarn or thread) so that they run lengthwise in weaving. Nautical. To move (a vessel) by hauling on a line that is fastened to or around a piling, anchor, or pier. v.intr. To become bent or twisted out of shape: The wooden frame warped in the humidity. To turn aside from a true, correct, or natural course; go astray. See synonyms at distort. Nautical. To move a vessel by hauling on a line that is fastened to or around a piling, anchor, or pier.
weddellWeddell, James wedl (1787-1834) Navigator, explorer, and seal hunter, born in Ostend, NW Belgium. He undertook three voyages to Antarctica in the sealing brig Jane, in the third of which (1822-3) he penetrated to the point 74'15`S by 34'17`W in that part of Antarctica which later took his name (Weddell Sea, Weddell Quadrant). A type of seal from this area is also named after him.
welling v., welled, well·ing, wells. v.intr. To rise to the surface, ready to flow: Tears welled in my eyes. To rise or surge from an inner source: Anger welled up in me. v.tr. To pour forth. [Middle English welle, from Old English.]
wrenshall